Tips and Tools

Welcome to Mozo's Tips & Tools zone, where we'll crunch your financial numbers, give you insider tips and bust that banking jargon to get you money savvy. From home loan calculators to budgeting tools, we've got you covered.

Calculators

The first hurdle to managing your money is knowing where you're at. Our free calculators afford a clearer picture.

Jargon Buster

Possibly even more confusing than a bunch of money numbers are the words that purport to explain them.

So if you've been charged an inexplicable fee, or have all manner of terms and clauses in a banking contract, let Mozo bust your jargon jam.

Neat links

Helpful as we are, you might want to check out some other sites around the place that can help with money matters.

  • Currency converter

    This online currency converter has the latest worldwide currency rates and lets you perform currency conversions in a flash.

    XE Universal Currency Converter

  • Credit report

    Get a free copy of your credit report at MyCreditFile and check your credit rating, which is used by lenders to assess your application for loans, credit cards, phone accounts and more.

    Check out MyCreditFile

  • First home owner grant

    The Government's first home owner scheme provides a one off grant of up to $21,000 to eligible first home owners. You can find all the details and even apply online.

    First home owner grant

  • Lost super

    Looking for lost super? The ATO's free online SuperSeeker service looks for your lost super in real time and finds possible matches. You can also do a more extensive lost super search over the phone.

    SuperSeeker

  • Consolidate super

    If you want to consolidate your super by transferring it from one fund to another, here's a link to the ATO's superannuation portability form which you can download online.

    Super portability form

  • Unclaimed money

    ASIC's free online unclaimed money search tool will help you find money left in old bank accounts, company shares or life policies that you might have forgotten about or didn't even know you had.

    Unclaimed money search

  • Financial Ombudsman

    If you need to make an official complaint against a banking, insurance or investment provider, the Financial Ombudsman is a free and independent dispute resolution service.

    Check out the Financial Ombudsman

  • Switching Bank Accounts

    The Government has introduced new measures to make it easier for you to switch banks if you are not satisfied with your current one.

    Get switching help

  • First home saver account calculator

    If you're saving for your first home, FIDO's new home saver account calculator and checklist can help you decide if this type of account is for you.

    Get first home saving help

Articles

Our articles have all the info you need to minimise fees, max out your benefits and get your finances sorted.

  • Credit card articles

    Airlines named worst offenders for excessive credit card surcharges

    Airlines, taxis, major hotels and restaurants have been called out as the worst offenders for credit card surcharging by Australian consumers as new research by MasterCard revealed that credit card surcharges are costing us $800 million annually.

    Read more...

  • Debit card articles

    Beyond science fiction: PayPal and Samsung to launch payment by fingerprint

    PayPal and Samsung are extending their collaboration with a new biometric feature that will allow users of the new Galaxy S5 smartphone to use fingerprint authentication for mobile payments with PayPal merchants.

    Read more...

  • Home loan articles

    Stamp duty called one of Australia's most inefficient taxes

    The Housing Industry Association of Australia (HIA) has thrown its support for a broad based debate on Australia's taxation system calling for the removal of a number of inefficient taxes including stamp duty.

    Read more...

  • Savings account articles

    Tactics for beating private health insurance price hikes

    Private health insurance just got more expensive for the average Australians as the largest increase to hit private health customers in 9 years came into effect yesterday. Health insurance premiums are expected to rise by an average 6.2 per cent, which equates to an average price hike of $250 a year.Mozo spokesperson Kirsty Lamont said that many Australians will be feeling the impact of the price hike in their hip pocket and a lot of people will be thinking twice about maintaining their private health insurance, but its important not to panic."Don't do a dump and run," she said. "Spend some time shopping around first to see if you can save. You can save hundreds of dollars by shopping around and choosing the best policy for your needs."With a typical family private health insurance policy now costing around $4000 a year, the price hike has presented a good opportunity for policy holders to take stock and really think about the cover they really need."Compare your current policy against other options but don't just choose a policy on premium price alone," Ms Lamont said. "Take a close look at what your covered for and not covered for to determine how much value you'll get out of the policy."Here are Mozo's top tips to manage health insurance costs.Don't pay for extras you don't need. Match your policy to your needs not the other way around. If you're young its unlikely you'll need a hip replacement and if you're older you could scrap the need for pregnancy cover.

    Read more...

  • Term deposit articles

    Have term deposits lost their appeal?

    When then global financial crisis (GFC) made fiscal uncertainty the norm in 2008, term deposits became more than just a way to balance an investment portfolio.

    Read more...

  • Reserve bank articles

    Reserve bank to cut rates?

    Aussies could be in for a boost if the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) goes ahead with plans to cut the base interest rate next week, as analysts have predicted it will.

    Read more...

  • Interest rate articles

    Interest rate cuts 'may not happen this year'

    Many Aussies were bitterly disappointed when the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA) decided not to lower interest rates earlier this month and it seems unlikely that any reductions will be seen until the new year.

    Read more...

Got any other links you think are useful?

Let us know here