Electricity bills: Residential usage skyrockets since COVID-19

Ceyda Erem

29 Jun 2020

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If we asked you to put a number on how much electricity Australia has used since the Covid-19 lockdown began, what would you say? 

Well, according to estimates by solar equipment supplier Nature Solar, residential electricity usage has increased by 105% due to COVID-19 restrictions. 

Following a data collection period between 2019 and 2020, Nature Solar found that in March last year, households used an average of 513kWh every month. In March 2020, that number more than doubled and now sits at 1052kWh. 

Chief executive and founder of Natural Solar, Chris Williams says it won’t be long until Aussie households start feeling the pinch. 

“We anticipate power bills will spike from a quarterly average of $405.75 to over $800 per household for this Covid-19 affected period,” he said.

“Some Australian homes that have had historically high power usage can expect their power bills to hit their hip pockets hard.” 

However, Williams explained that there are some energy customers who may not have to prepare for a higher bill. 

“We know households with solar and battery power are still likely to save money on their bills during this time.”

These figures are consistent with recent Mozo research, which showed that the average Aussie family working from home could be expected to fork out an extra $527 every six months, or $88 a month. 

And with winter well and truly here, that figure then typically climbs to a jaw-dropping $1,582 as more Aussies switch on their heating appliances.

So if you’re expecting to see a difference in your energy bill, why not take our energy bill comparison tool for a spin?

It compares some of the available plans in your area and provides estimates on how much you could be paying. All you need to do is enter your postcode below!

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