Device ban: the good news Aussie travellers have been waiting for

Roisin Kelly-Goldsmith

Wednesday 29 March 2017

Aussie jetsetters concerned over the US and UK’s device ban now have one less thing to worry about, when it comes to the risk of their tech goods getting damaged in checked baggage.

device-ban-good-news-aussie-travellers

That’s because at least one travel insurance provider has made room in its travel policy to cover electronics transported in the cargo, when a customer’s airline doesn’t allow them onboard.

Chief Operating Officer at 1Cover, Richard Warburton announced the good news this week, saying it was the first travel insurer to tweak their policy due to the ban.

“Hopefully, this will set the precedence for other insurers, meaning more travellers can benefit,” he added.

Warburton expected that the device ban, which includes iPads and laptops, would take a toll on Aussie holidaymakers bringing their little ones overseas.

“Many parents rely on these electronic devices to entertain their children on gruelling long flights, and taking this option away will really impact the quality of the in-flight experience for the child and parents.”

The policy changes are effective immediately, meaning 1Cover customers en route to places such as Turkey and Middle East with connecting flights to London will have their electronics protected by insurance.

Why is there a device ban?

According to the US’s Department of Homeland Security, electronic devices larger than the size of a mobile phone pose a threat to flight security.

Which devices are banned?

Electronics such as iPads and laptops. But if you have a medical condition that requires you to bring a larger device on board for your health, it may be allowed after extra screening.

Will I be affected?

You will if you’re flying out from certain Middle Eastern and North African countries to the US or UK. The most popular airport on the list is Abu Dhabi in Dubai.

Tips for looking after your devices (and data):

1. Buy protective casing to protect your devices for when your checked in luggage is moved by baggage handlers at the airport.

2. Tell your insurer what you’re taking on holidays with you, so your most valuable electronics can be accounted for if you need to make a claim down the track. Remember, your electronics won’t necessarily get covered if they’re in your check in baggage so factor this into your online comparison.

3. Backup your laptop data before you leave in case your device gets lost or stolen. And don’t forget to set passwords on them too!

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