Enova Energy set to roll out to Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong, October 2019

Tara McCabe

17 Sep 2019

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If the climate crisis, fires in the Amazon and news of fracking in the Northern Territory have you worried about where your energy is coming from, then you’ll be happy to hear that as of October 1st 2019, Enova Energy will be servicing Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong.

So if you live in one of these NSW cities and you’re looking to switch to an energy provider that invests more in renewable energy and is more aligned with your values, then you now have one more energy provider to choose from.

UPDATE: As of October 23 2019, Enova Energy have now launched across Sydney, the Central Cost, Newcastle, Wollongong and other surrounding areas. 

About Enova Energy

Enova Energy launched in June 2016 in Byron Bay, as ‘Australia’s first community-owned electricity provider.’ The self-described social enterprise is owned by more than 1,600 Australian community shareholders and invests 50% of profits (after tax and reinvestment) back into the community, by way of renewable energy projects, energy education and energy efficiency services.

How does Enova’s pricing compare?

Although Enova are yet to release their pricing for Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong, the energy provider’s current energy rates for regional New South Wales may give some indication of what you can expect to pay.

Enova currently offer both residential and business energy plans in regional New South Wales. If you’re looking for a home energy plan then you can choose from either the Enova Solar Premium or the Community Plus plan. Both plans have a current (anytime) usage rate of 27.72c per kWh and a daily supply charge of 163.90c. 

If you already have solar panels that feed into the grid and are larger than 2.5 KW then the Solar Premium plan might be the best option for you. 

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Features of the Solar Premium plan include:

• 16 cents per kWh for the first 6kWh exported to the grid each day (9 cents per kWh for remaining energy exported daily).

• Bills monthly as opposed to every 3 months - Enova send bills once a month so that you don’t have to worry about paying a hefty 3 months worth of energy all at once.

• No exit fees.

• Bills sent via email to save trees.

• The ability to support a community owned energy company that invests in renewable energy projects.

But don’t worry if you haven’t been able to invest in solar panels just yet, the Community Plus plan is designed for customers who don’t yet have rooftop solar or have a solar system smaller than 2.5 KW. 

Key features of the Community Plus plan include:

• 3% discount when you pay on time (discount applies to the energy usage portion of your bill).

• A feed in tariff of 9c per kWh available.

• No exit fees.

• Monthly bills to avoid bill shock.

• Bill sent via email to save trees.

• The future potential to invest in renewable energy with the proposed launch of Sydney’s first ever solar garden. 

Although Enova’s usage rates are below the Australian Energy Regulator’s current energy reference price (at the time of writing), the energy provider’s plans aren’t the cheapest around. So if you’re after the cheapest energy deal then this may not be for you. 

That said, Enova does offer a competitive solar feed in tariff rate with the Enova Solar Premium plan. The average feed in tariff rate for residential homes in New South Wales is 10c per kWh exported, whereas Enova offer 16c per kWh exported (for the first 6kWh). 

Enova’s aim is to help local communities move away from fossil fuels and invest in renewable energy. So if your income is a little too tight for solar panel installation right now, you’re currently renting or your rooftop is pretty shady, Enova’s not-for-profit arm is designed to give you access to renewable energy.

One way Enova hopes to empower customers without solar panels is through solar gardens.

What is a solar garden?

A solar garden is quite simply an array of solar panels that you, as a customer, can buy or lease. Just like in a community garden where you can lease out or buy a veggie patch, in a solar garden you can buy a solar panel and reap the financial rewards. The solar garden is usually built on the roof of a local business or organisation that can make use of the energy on a daily basis. 

So if, for example, you currently rent an apartment and installing solar panels isn’t an option for you right now, then you can buy a solar panel in a solar garden. The energy generated by your solar panel will be added as a real time credit to your home energy bill, with any extra energy being fed back into the grid at the agreed feed in tariff rate.

Enova is planning to launch Sydney’s first solar garden in November 2019, closely followed by the opening of the first solar garden in northern NSW. 

RELATED ARTICLE: Australia is guaranteed to hit its 2020 renewable energy target, but experts say there’s more to be done 

What’s next? 

Enova has plans to expand to south east Queensland in 2020 and Victoria and South Australia in the future, so if you live in any of these states then stay tuned for updates. 

Take control of your energy bill 

If you are looking to get a better deal on your energy bill, then why not check out Mozo’s Energy Cost Cruncher to see if you could be paying less. Just enter your postcode and the number of people residing in your home and we’ll calculate the best energy deals available in your area. You can also check out the best deals in your state with Mozo’s energy deals comparison tool

Or if you want help navigating the ins and outs of renewable energy, solar power and energy bill jargon, why not check out our must read energy guides.

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