Energy appliances

Compare NSW energy provider deals

Switching energy plans could lower your energy bill. Mozo can help you compare NSW energy plan options to see if you could save by making the switch. Whether you’re after a new gas or electricity deal or moving house and need a new connection, our energy comparison tool is free to use. Enter your NSW postcode below to get started.

Read more

Does Mozo compare all energy plans available in my NSW suburb? 

Mozo’s compares plans from a wide number of energy providers in NSW including major retailers like Energy Australia, AGL and through to new providers like Powershop, Sumo and Energy Locals. We don’t compare every energy provider that operates in NSW and for the providers that we do compare, our service includes the energy plans and deals that are currently available to new customers in NSW. 

How do I switch energy providers in NSW once I’ve compared plans?  

NSW is a deregulated energy market so you can switch energy providers at any time. You don’t need to wait for your next bill or do it by a set date. 

Everything from comparing provider plans and prices to signing up with your new energy provider can be done here on Mozo. Once you’ve found a good deal using our tool, you can set up your new energy account with the new provider. There are no phone calls to make and we’ll even notify your old provider for you.  

How can Mozo help me to save money on energy costs? 

In addition to our electricity and gas comparison tool that helps you to compare the cost of your existing NSW energy plan with other deals available, Mozo has an inhouse team of energy experts who spend their time researching the latest industry insights and information putting this info into helpful energy guides and savings tips to help you be more energy wise. 

We also publish energy provider customer reviews on our site, so that you can get the inside scoop from real customers to help you make more informed decisions when choosing a new power company for your home.

Why choose Mozo to compare energy?

  • Trusted expertise

    Trusted expertise

    A trailblazer in financial comparison since 2008, Mozo is used by millions of Australians each year.

  • We've got your back

    We’ve got your back

    Our electricity comparison tools, guides and savings tips exist for one reason, to help you save money on your electricity bills.

  • Totally free

    Totally free

    Comparing with us is always free. No hidden fees and we remain transparent throughout every step of the process.

Find the right electricity deal for you. It’s simple.

  • Search

    Step 1. Search

    Simply enter your postcode and get personalised results to suit your needs.

  • Compare plans

    Step 2. Compare

    See available electricity plans ranked by cost and compare deals side by side.

  • Connect

    Step 3. Connect

    Choose a plan. We’ll notify your old and new provider for a seamless switch.

How to compare energy providers in NSW

If you live in NSW you live in a state with a competitive energy market. This means you can choose your energy retailer. So, if you’ve been putting up with energy bill price increases each quarter and thinking there isn’t much you can do about it, you’re wrong. You can fight back by getting a better energy deal. 

The good news is that comparing energy in NSW is simple using Mozo’s price comparison tool. We compare plans from leading energy providers across NSW and will give you price estimates for each plan in our database so that you can find the one that best meets your budget. We can help you to compare gas and electricity plans separately or together. 

It is a good idea to have a recent bill handy as this will enable us to give you a more accurate estimate. If you don’t have one, that’s ok, we can still give you an estimate based on the number of people in your home and your estimated usage.

Who is the best energy provider in NSW?

There isn’t one best energy provider for every household in NSW. The best provider for you and your home will depend on a number of factors including your individual usage, the time of usage, type of usage and your postcode. 

There are also other factors that come into choosing an energy plan. If price is your biggest consideration then the best plan will be the cheapest one. But these days, more people are putting more emphasis on social and environmental factors and choose an energy provider based on whether they generate energy via renewable sources or offer green energy plans.  

Each year, Mozo’s team of energy experts conduct the Mozo Experts Choice Energy Awards where they compare the plan costs of all providers in our database and award those with the best value plans. 

Then there’s the Mozo People’s Choice Household Awards, and this is where we ask Australian consumers to rate their energy provider on a number of criteria. We tally up the results and award those energy providers that are voted best by their customers.  

Which energy provider is cheapest in NSW?

There isn’t one provider that is the cheapest for every home in NSW, but Mozo can help you see if you can save money by switching from your existing plan to a new one. To get started, simply put your NSW postcode into your comparison tool at the top of this page. 

If you are wanting to lower your energy bill, in addition to switching energy providers you might want to do a home audit to see if there are additional things that you could be doing around the home that could reduce the amount of energy you’re using. Check out our energy savings tips hub to get some ideas. 

What should I look for in a good energy plan? 

Every energy provider that operates in NSW will have a range of energy plans for you to choose from. While many energy providers will have ‘sign up’ incentives for new customers such as “get $50 off your first bill” or 50% off your first electricity bill, there are other features you should consider:

  • Pay on time discount. Many NSW energy providers will offer customers discounts for paying their bill on time. But don’t be fooled by the discount amount. A 10% discount with provider A could be more than an 18% discount with provider B. 
  • Direct debit discount. You can get money knocked off your bill simply by setting up a direct debit from your account. You’ll still receive bill notification of your usage but you don’t need to worry about making the payment as the provider will directly debit your account on the due date. Just make sure you have enough funds in the account on the payment date or you could be hit with a missed payment fee and a bank fee. 
  • Clean energy generation. Opting for a plan that generates some or all of the energy via renewable sources could be a better option for your budget (and conscious) than one that generates it via coal. 
  • Bill smoothing. If budgeting is top of mind, some energy retailers in NSW have plans that enable you to spread out the cost of your electricity in regular instalments over the year, rather than in quarterly chunks. 

What types of energy plans can I choose from?

There are a range of energy plans available in the NSW energy market, but the main two are market retail and standard retail plans.

Market retail plan
These are set by energy retailers, and can change at any time, even if you’ve just signed up. Because the prices are set by the retailer, you can often get discounts, or enjoy the benefits of a fixed plan for a certain period.

Standard retail plan - default market offer
If you haven’t switched energy plans in a while, you could find you are on a standard retail energy plan. Regulatory changes made in July 2019, meant that if you were not on a market offer plan you would be moved onto the government-mandated ‘Default Market Offer’ (DMO). The DMO prices are often set by the government, depending on where you live. 

You might also find that your energy provider offers the following types of plans: 

  • Dual Fuel: When you sign up with the same provider for both your gas as well as electricity services. It’s convenient to deal with just one provider for both services and many energy companies offer discounts if you sign up with them for dual fuel services.
  • GreenPower: The GreenPower Program is a government managed scheme that lets you match your electricity usage with certified sustainable power. This means that when you buy a GreenPower certified plan from your energy provider, they buy the equivalent amount of electricity as specified by you from accredited renewable energy generators. This renewable energy will not be directly supplied to your home but it is pumped into the grid by the provider for you.
  • Prepaid Power Packs: Think of this as a similar deal to a prepaid mobile phone plan. Just like you can prepay for the calls you’re going to make in a month, certain providers like Powershop will let you pre-purchase power for your home at a set price. This could help you save money and reduce the chance of bill shock by helping you budget better depending on your energy needs.
  • Bill smoothing: Bill smoothing refers to a payment plan where instead of receiving quarterly bills, the energy supplier gives you the option to distribute estimated power costs across equal monthly, fortnightly or even weekly instalments. If you’ve been with the same supplier for more than a year, these costs are estimated based on your annual energy usage. For new customers, the retailer calculates the cost using other customer usage data in your area.
  • Time-of-use plans: This means that you’ll be charged different rates for using energy during peak, shoulder and off peak time frames. So you’ll have to pay higher rates for using electricity at peak hours, lower rates during the shoulder period and the lowest rate at off-peak times. This plan tends to be ideal for people who have the flexibility to regularly use energy in non-peak times. This type of plan is only available if the electricity meter at your home allows for time of use calculations. 

Is there an energy rebate in NSW?

The NSW government offers a number of rebates to help you reduce the cost of your energy bills. If you are eligible, you can apply for a combination of rebates reducing your energy bill substantially.

Rebates include:

Low income household rebate: The Low Income Household Rebate helps people with a valid concession card issued by the Commonwealth Department of Human Services or the Department of Veterans’ Affairs pay their electricity bill.

Gas rebate: The NSW Gas Rebate helps people who hold eligible concession cards issued by the Commonwealth Department of Human Services or the Department of Veterans' Affairs pay their natural gas or residential LPG bills.

Family energy rebate: The Family Energy Rebate helps eligible households pay their electricity bill if they have dependent children and received the Family Tax Benefit payment from the Commonwealth Department of Human Services.

Life support rebate: The Life Support Rebate helps people pay their electricity bills if they are required or have someone living with them who is required to use approved energy-intensive equipment at home.

Medical energy rebate: The Medical Energy Rebate helps people who hold eligible concession cards issued by the Commonwealth Department of Human Services or the Department of Veterans' Affairs pay their electricity bill if either they, or someone living with them, has an inability to self-regulate body temperature when exposed to extremes of environmental temperatures (hot or cold).

Seniors energy rebate: Independent retirees who hold a valid Commonwealth Seniors Health Card can apply for the Seniors Energy Rebate. This rebate provides eligible households with a $200 rebate, per year, to help with the cost of living. The rebate is for independent self-funded retirees only. Pensioners and veterans may be eligible for the $285 Low Income Household Rebate.

Energy accounts payment assistance scheme: The Energy Accounts Payment Assistance (EAPA) Scheme helps people experiencing a short term financial crisis or emergency to pay their electricity or natural gas bill. This scheme is only for short term assistance.

To find out if you are eligible for any of the following rebates you can check out the NSW Govt energy saver website

Does the government regulate pricing for energy in NSW?

On 1 July 2017, the NSW Government deregulated pricing for energy, which meant a more competitive market for households and small businesses. 

But just because the market is deregulated, it doesn’t mean that you automatically get a better deal with your energy provider. Just like other products like your mortgage and car insurance, you should shop around each year to make sure that the energy plan you are on is still delivering you good value.   

How much does energy cost in NSW?

The cost of your energy service will be determined by a number of factors including where you live in NSW and how much energy you consume. Energy providers in NSW will calculate your bill based on:

  • fixed supply charge: a fixed price per day for your service
  • usage: charged per kilowatt hour of usage     

Does the type of electricity and gas meter make a difference to the cost of my energy bill?  

Yes, the meter that is installed at your premise will determine the tariff you’re charged. In NSW there isn’t a government led initiative around the rollout of smart meters for all residential customers so the type of energy meter at your property will depend on how old your property is and the energy distributor in your area. The distributor is responsible for installing meters.

There are a number of meters available in NSW including:

  • Accumulation meters. These meters keep track of the accumulated electricity usage. You are charged a single flat rate for the electricity you use, so if you have this kind of meter at your premises you will generally be on a single tariff plan. 
  • Interval Meters: Record how much energy you use at different times of the day and are called time of use meters. The benefit of these meters is that you will be charged different rates for your electricity usage depending on the time of day.   
  • Smart meters: These are digital meters that measure energy use every 30 minutes. With a smart meter you are also able to choose more flexible pricing plans that allow for discounts depending on the time of day. Want more info, read our smart meter guide.



Energy comparison NSW FAQs


I’m moving to NSW, how can I compare plans? 

If you are moving to NSW or moving to a new suburb our service can also help you. While you won’t have your existing bill to compare against we can still show you energy plans in that area or NSW postcode for average households of a similar size and with similar energy usage. 

I’m renting a property in NSW, can I still switch energy plans? 

Yes, even if you’re renting a property in NSW you can switch energy plans to a provider that best meets your needs. If electricity or gas is included in your rent then you will not be able to switch providers as it will be your landlord who has responsibility for the energy service at your rental property. Check out our renters guide to switching energy.

How long does it take to switch energy providers in NSW?

If you are switching providers but not moving premises the amount of time it will take for you to switch providers will depend on your last meter read. It can take up to 3 months for you to start receiving bills from your new energy provider. If you are moving house, many NSW energy providers will have “move in” guarantees that ensure that your energy will be available on the date of your move. You will generally need to give them 2-5 days notice of the moving date.  

There could be differences in the switching times for other Australian states. See more info on:

Will it cost me anything to switch?  

Energy providers in NSW do not charge you to switch providers if you are on an open contract. If you have signed a fixed term deal, you might be required to pay an exit fee if you terminate before the contract is finished.  If you are moving, most energy providers that operate in NSW charge connection fees for setting up the account and service to your home. The cost for this is usually added to your first bill.

How does Mozo make money? 

Mozo makes money by helping energy providers connect with customers, like you, who are looking for a great energy deal. Most importantly our service is totally free to use and it is the energy providers competing for your business that pay Mozo, not you! 

Mozo earns a fee when you click through on a ‘go to site’ button and are taken to an energy provider’s web site and continue your purchase. These placements are all marked ‘promoted’ or ‘sponsored’ so it’s very transparent and what you see is what you get! Mozo may also earn revenue when energy providers purchase display advertising on our site or when we help them use the all the great data we’ve collected.

Picture of Ceyda Erem
Ceyda Erem
Money writer

Ceyda Erem was Mozo’s lead energy writer as well as covering personal finance across the site until May 2021. She put her research and writing talents into stories that helped our readers to make more informed financial choices, whether that’s about finding the best energy deal or writing about the latest sneaky bank tricks. Ceyda has a Bachelor of Arts (major in writing) from Macquarie University. She is also  ASIC RG146 (Tier 2) certified for general advice.

*To calculate the potential savings figure Mozo identified the lowest plan provided by Mozo and highest cost plan in each energy distributor state region based on the average residential usage in that state. The costs data used across the state is current at 17 August 2020. Not all plans will be available via the Mozo energy comparison service. Your individual usage and location, along with which plan you are on and which plans are available on the Mozo site at any given time, will vary the savings you may be able to achieve using the Mozo energy comparison service.

Energy Provider Reviews

Synergy Electricity review
Overall 10/10
Synergy, doing it right together

Synergy is a fantastic service provider, they understand their customers needs and are active in supplying renewable and green energy sources.

Read full review

Synergy is a fantastic service provider, they understand their customers needs and are active in supplying renewable and green energy sources.

Price
10/10
Bill clarity
10/10
Customer service
10/10
Green Friendly
10/10
Less
Jesse, Western Australia, reviewed 6 days ago
Alinta Energy Gas review
Overall 8/10
pretty smooth energy

they are good

Read full review

they are good

Price
9/10
Bill clarity
7/10
Customer service
10/10
Green Friendly
10/10
Less
Charlie, Victoria, reviewed 6 days ago
Alinta Energy Electricity review
Overall 10/10
A good power company to work with.

I have never had a problem that was not fixed very quick. Easy to get information if required. Easy to deal with.

Read full review

I have never had a problem that was not fixed very quick. Easy to get information if required. Easy to deal with.

Price
7/10
Bill clarity
7/10
Customer service
10/10
Less
John, Queensland, reviewed 6 days ago

Latest Energy news

Woman changing lightbulb

Most recommended electricity providers in the mozo people s choice awards

Over the past year plenty of Australians have spent more time at home than ever before. But more time in the house has meant more heating, more air conditioning, more cooking and certainly more Netflix.

Read More
Winter energy bill

How to get on top of your energy bill this winter

Although we may be days away from the official start of winter, the recent chill hasn’t stopped many Aussies from dusting off their heaters and pulling out their favourite knitted jumpers. Unfortunately, one thing households aren’t always prepared for is a higher than normal energy bill, as winter is one season where our electricity and gas usage typically jumps. The good news is there’s still time for households to get ahead this winter and switch to a better value energy plan before the dreaded July 1 price hike. But where do you start? Comparing energy plans can be a tricky task, especially if it’s been a while since you last shopped around. But if Mozo analysis is anything to go by, it’s well worth the hustle in the long run.According to our 2020 Energy Report, depending on the distribution zone, Aussie households have the potential to save between $200 - $300 a year on their annual energy bill just by making the switch from the average to the cheapest energy plan. There are a number of things you’ll want to consider when comparing energy plans, like whether you prefer to sign up for a contract or a no-contract deal. Opting for the latter can provide more flexibility in terms of switching, while a contract energy plan can give you the chance to lock in prices for a fixed time period. Other features you might want to compare are any fees or whether the retailer offers GreenPower options. With a GreenPower plan, the retailer vows to purchase the equivalent amount of electricity you have nominated, which can range between 10% - 100%, from clean energy sources, like solar, wind or hydro.

Read More
Renewable energy budget

Gas primary focus for the budget leaving renewable energy behind

Between changes to home ownership and increases to superannuation, it’s been a big week for finance news. But things have also perked up within the energy sector, with the Federal Government unveiling a $1.6 billion plan as a part of the 2021 Budget. Over the next four years, the government will primarily focus on low-emissions technologies, allocating $635 million to this cause. Some of those investments will include building renewable energy microgrids in remote areas in the Northern Territory and Northern Queensland.“Our 2021-22 Budget measures will provide reliable, secure and affordable energy to all Australians, and increase investment in technology solutions to reduce emissions in a way that supports jobs and economic growth,” said Minister for Energy and Emissions Reduction, Angus Taylor. “This Budget builds on the Government’s existing initiatives to guarantee reliable and affordable energy, stimulate jobs and reduce emissions without imposing new costs on households, businesses or the economy.”An additional $25 million will be allocated to assist new gas generators with making the transition to hydrogen. However, many critics have argued that the Budget overlooks necessary funding for network upgrades, which is argued to be essential for the future of electricity stability and reliability. “If this truly is the infrastructure budget, Infrastructure Australia has identified that there is a need for major transmission upgrades to supply network access to renewable energy zones as a high priority, particularly in light of retiring thermal generation,” said Clean Energy Council’s chief executive, Kane Thornton. “It’s disappointing that in a ‘nation-building’ infrastructure budget, upgrades that will enable the access and security of clean, low-cost power have not been prioritised.”

Read More
Vic ev

Vic gov to provide 20 000 subsidies for electric vehicles

In an effort to transform Victorian roads, the Victorian government has announced it will be offering 20,000 subsidies of up to $3,000 for the purchase of new electric vehicles (EVs) under $69,000. The new initiative is a part of the government’s plan to have half of all new cars sold in Victoria emission-free by 2030. The first 4,000 subsidies were made available on 2 May 2021. “When people get an EV (electric vehicle) they are starting to save significant dollars off their bills," climate change minister, Lily D 'Ambrosio told the ABC."It's almost up to $1,600 that is saved off fuel and maintenance costs, each and every year, so we want to make it easier for Victorians.''In addition to the subsidies, the VIC government also plans to spend $19 million on new charging stations and an extra $10 million on government EVs, which it hopes will amount to more than 400 EVs over the next two years."This is very, very ambitious but [a plan] we are absolutely committed to achieving,” said D'Ambrosio.

Read More
August roundup

Rooftop solar customers could be charged to export electricity under new aer suggestion

Back in March, the Australian Energy Regulator (AER) suggested that Aussies with rooftop solar who export excess electricity to the grid be charged a cost for doing so. They said this new rule could help the electricity grid cope with large influxes of renewable energy generation brought on by rooftop solar. "The poles and wires businesses were set up to get electricity from a big generator, like a coal plant or a gas plant, down those wires and into your house," said AEMC chief executive, Benn Barr. "That change we've seen over the last 10,15 years is a two-way flow … now power is not just going to your house, but power is coming from your house. The system hasn't been set up to deal with that.Barr argued that the prices would be flexible and be left up to power companies to determine, however, Aussies will still be able to earn cash by exporting electricity when required. "We've modelled different charges from $10 to $100, depending upon the size of your solar system," Barr added. "You get a good return from solar. And it's not going to make it uneconomical for customers to put it on their roof.” However, not everyone is on board with the idea. Professor at Victoria University, Bruce Mountain told ABC’s 7:30 program that this measure would decrease a household’s income received for exporting solar by 80%. This could also see fewer Aussies interested in making the switch to solar power. It’s no secret that Aussies are big fans of solar power, with recent research from the Clean Energy Regulator found that as of 31 December 2020, more than 2.66 million households have had a solar system installed. But could a proposed tax forecast a dive in solar uptake amongst Aussie households? "Essentially, they will get the equivalent of a hamburger a year as their income from rooftop solar sales,” Mountain told 7.30. “I think that's very likely to bring pressure in the rooftop solar market, and customers will be less interested in it.” It’s unclear whether this proposed change will go ahead. But if you’d like to learn more about how solar power can benefit the environment and your wallet, have a read of our solar power guide.

Read More